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Minnesota State Paternity Laws

posted by DNA Identifiers @ 1:41 PM
Monday, June 22, 2009

minnesota

The below information is a general guide to Minnesota State Paternity Laws. Please conduct further research on your state laws for current or updated information or contact a family attorney for professional legal advice. For information on state collection locations, click here.

Link: Minnesota Being a Legal Father: Parentage Information for Mothers and Fathers (DHS-3159a)

Link: Minnesota Department of Human Services – Establishing Paternity

Link: Minnesota Department Of Health – Adding A Father’s Name

 
 
Required Probability of Paternity for Minnesota Courts: 99% - if the probability is 92 percent or greater, upon motion the court shall order the alleged father to pay temporary child support determined according to chapter 518A. The alleged father shall pay the support money to the public authority if the public authority is a party and is providing services to the parties or, if not, into court pursuant to the Rules of Civil Procedure to await the results of the paternity proceedings.  (257.62 Subdivision 5)

Required Paternity Index: .05

Current Minnesota Paternity Law: Statues 257

257.34 DECLARATION OF PARENTAGE.

Subdivision 1.Acknowledgment by parents.

The mother and father of a child born to a mother who was not married to the child’s father when the child was conceived nor when the child was born may, in a writing signed by both of them before a notary public, declare and acknowledge under oath that they are the biological parents of the child. The declaration may provide that any such child born to the mother at any time before or up to ten months after the date of execution of the declaration is the biological child of the signatories. Execution of the declaration shall:

(a) have the same consequences as an acknowledgment by the signatories of parentage of the child for the purposes of sections 62A.041 and 62C.14, subdivision 5a;

(b) be conclusive evidence that the signatories are parents of the child for the purposes of sections 176.111, 197.75, and 197.752;

(c) create a presumption that the signatory is the biological father of the child for the purposes of sections 257.51 to 257.74;

(d) when timely filed with the Department of Health as provided in section 259.52, qualify as an affidavit stating the intention of the signatories to retain parental rights as provided in section 259.52 if it contains the information required by section 259.52 or rules promulgated thereunder;

(e) have the same consequences as a writing declaring paternity of the child for the purposes of section 524.2-109; and

(f) be conclusive evidence that the signatories are parents of the child for the purposes of chapter 573.

Subd. 2.

[Repealed, 1987 c 403 art 3 s 98]

Subd. 3.Effect of declaration.

The declaration authorized by subdivision 1 shall not affect the rights or duties arising out of a parent-child relationship of any person not a signatory to the declaration claiming to be the parent of the child nor shall the declaration impair any rights of the child arising out of a parent-child relationship against any person not a signatory to the declaration.

Subd. 4.Expiration of authority for declarations.

No acknowledgment of parentage shall be entered into on or after August 1, 1995, under this section. The mother and father of a child born to a mother who was not married to the child’s father when the child was conceived nor when the child was born may before, on, or after August 1, 1995, sign a recognition of parentage under section 257.75.

History:

1980 c 561 s 3; 1981 c 349 s 1; 1983 c 7 s 7; 1983 c 243 s 5 subd 7; 1985 c 250 s 23; 1987 c 384 art 2 s 64; 1987 c 403 art 3 s 45; 1994 c 631 s 31; 1995 c 257 art 4 s 3; 2000 c 260 s 31

257.54 HOW PARENT AND CHILD RELATIONSHIP ESTABLISHED.

The parent and child relationship between a child and:

(a) the biological mother may be established by proof of her having given birth to the child, or under sections 257.51 to 257.74 or 257.75;

(b) the biological father may be established under sections 257.51 to 257.74 or 257.75; or

(c) an adoptive parent may be established by proof of adoption.

History:

1980 c 589 s 4; 1987 c 403 art 3 s 96; 1Sp1993 c 1 art 6 s 33

257.55 PRESUMPTION OF PATERNITY.

Subdivision 1.Presumption.

A man is presumed to be the biological father of a child if:

(a) he and the child’s biological mother are or have been married to each other and the child is born during the marriage, or within 280 days after the marriage is terminated by death, annulment, declaration of invalidity, dissolution, or divorce, or after a decree of legal separation is entered by a court. The presumption in this paragraph does not apply if the man has joined in a recognition of parentage recognizing another man as the biological father under section 257.75, subdivision 1a;

(b) before the child’s birth, he and the child’s biological mother have attempted to marry each other by a marriage solemnized in apparent compliance with law, although the attempted marriage is or could be declared void, voidable, or otherwise invalid, and:

(1) if the attempted marriage could be declared invalid only by a court, the child is born during the attempted marriage, or within 280 days after its termination by death, annulment, declaration of invalidity, dissolution or divorce; or

(2) if the attempted marriage is invalid without a court order, the child is born within 280 days after the termination of cohabitation;

(c) after the child’s birth, he and the child’s biological mother have married, or attempted to marry, each other by a marriage solemnized in apparent compliance with law, although the attempted marriage is or could be declared void, voidable, or otherwise invalid, and:

(1) he has acknowledged his paternity of the child in writing filed with the state registrar of vital statistics;

(2) with his consent, he is named as the child’s father on the child’s birth record; or

(3) he is obligated to support the child under a written voluntary promise or by court order;

(d) while the child is under the age of majority, he receives the child into his home and openly holds out the child as his biological child;

(e) he and the child’s biological mother acknowledge his paternity of the child in a writing signed by both of them under section 257.34 and filed with the state registrar of vital statistics. If another man is presumed under this paragraph to be the child’s father, acknowledgment may be effected only with the written consent of the presumed father or after the presumption has been rebutted;

(f) he and the child’s biological mother have executed a recognition of parentage in accordance with section 257.75 and another man is presumed to be the father under this subdivision;

(g) he and the child’s biological mother have executed a recognition of parentage in accordance with section 257.75 and another man and the child’s mother have executed a recognition of parentage in accordance with section 257.75; or

(h) he and the child’s biological mother executed a recognition of parentage in accordance with section 257.75 when either or both of the signatories were less than 18 years of age.

Subd. 2.Rebuttal.

A presumption under this section may be rebutted in an appropriate action only by clear and convincing evidence. If two or more presumptions arise which conflict with each other, the presumption which on the facts is founded on the weightier considerations of policy and logic controls. The presumption is rebutted by a court decree establishing paternity of the child by another man.

History:

1980 c 589 s 5; 1983 c 308 s 4; 1987 c 403 art 3 s 96; 1989 c 282 art 2 s 161; 1Sp1993 c 1 art 6 s 35; 1995 c 207 art 10 s 7; 1995 c 216 s 1; 1995 c 257 art 4 s 4; 1Sp2001 c 9 art 15 s 32; 2006 c 280 s 2

Link: Minnesota Statutes

This information is a general guide. Research your state laws for current information or contact a family attorney.

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