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Ohio State Paternity Laws

posted by DNA Identifiers @ 2:56 PM
Friday, July 24, 2009

ohio

The below information is a general guide to Ohio State Paternity Laws. Please conduct further research on your state laws for current or updated information or contact a family attorney for professional legal advice. For information on state collection locations, click here.

Link: Ohio Paternity Enhancement Program

Link: Ohio Legal Services – Paternity FAQ

Link: Ohio Paternity Froms

Link: Ohio State Department of Job and Family Services – Establishment of Paternity

Required Probability of Paternity for Ohio Courts: 99%

Required Paternity Index: None at this time

Current Ohio Paternity Law: Title 31 – Chapter 3111

3111.02 Establishing parent and child relationship.

(A) The parent and child relationship between a child and the child’s natural mother may be established by proof of her having given birth to the child or pursuant to sections 3111.01 to 3111.18 or 3111.20 to 3111.85 of the Revised Code. The parent and child relationship between a child and the natural father of the child may be established by an acknowledgment of paternity as provided in sections 3111.20 to 3111.35 of the Revised Code, and pursuant to sections 3111.01 to 3111.18 or 3111.38 to 3111.54 of the Revised Code. The parent and child relationship between a child and the adoptive parent of the child may be established by proof of adoption or pursuant to Chapter 3107. of the Revised Code.

(B) A court that is determining a parent and child relationship pursuant to this chapter shall give full faith and credit to a parentage determination made under the laws of this state or another state, regardless of whether the parentage determination was made pursuant to a voluntary acknowledgement of paternity, an administrative procedure, or a court proceeding.

Effective Date: 03-22-2001

3111.03 Presumption of paternity.

(A) A man is presumed to be the natural father of a child under any of the following circumstances:

(1) The man and the child’s mother are or have been married to each other, and the child is born during the marriage or is born within three hundred days after the marriage is terminated by death, annulment, divorce, or dissolution or after the man and the child’s mother separate pursuant to a separation agreement.

(2) The man and the child’s mother attempted, before the child’s birth, to marry each other by a marriage that was solemnized in apparent compliance with the law of the state in which the marriage took place, the marriage is or could be declared invalid, and either of the following applies:

(a) The marriage can only be declared invalid by a court and the child is born during the marriage or within three hundred days after the termination of the marriage by death, annulment, divorce, or dissolution;

(b) The attempted marriage is invalid without a court order and the child is born within three hundred days after the termination of cohabitation.

(3) An acknowledgment of paternity has been filed pursuant to section 3111.23 or former section 5101.314 of the Revised Code and has not become final under former section 3111.211 or 5101.314 or section 2151.232, 3111.25, or 3111.821 of the Revised Code.

(B) A presumption that arises under this section can only be rebutted by clear and convincing evidence that includes the results of genetic testing, except that a presumption that is conclusive as provided in division (A) of section 3111.95 or division (B) of section 3111.97 of the Revised Code cannot be rebutted. An acknowledgment of paternity that becomes final under section 2151.232, 3111.25, or 3111.821 of the Revised Code is not a presumption and shall be considered a final and enforceable determination of paternity unless the acknowledgment is rescinded under section 3111.28 or 3119.962 of the Revised Code. If two or more conflicting presumptions arise under this section, the court shall determine, based upon logic and policy considerations, which presumption controls.

(C)(1) Except as provided in division (C)(2) of this section, a presumption of paternity that arose pursuant to this section prior to March 22, 2001, shall remain valid on and after that date unless rebutted pursuant to division (B) of this section. This division does not apply to a determination described in division (B)(3) of this section as division (B)(3) of this section existed prior to March 22, 2001.

(2) A presumption of paternity that arose prior to March 22, 2001, based on an acknowledgment of paternity that became final under former section 3111.211 or 5101.314 or section 2151.232 of the Revised Code is not a presumption and shall be considered a final and enforceable determination of paternity unless the acknowledgment is rescinded under section 3111.28 or 3119.962 of the Revised Code.

Effective Date: 03-22-2001; 06-15-2006

Link: Ohio Laws

This information is a general guide. Research your state laws for current information or contact a family attorney.

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One Response to “Ohio State Paternity Laws”

  1. Rosio Lindamood says:

    This is exactly why you need a board certified family law attorney! thanks for the information. I will definitely revisit this blog again.

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