DNA Testing for Paternity, Maternity, Sibling and Immigration

Accredited Legal, Private, Clinical and Mobile DNA Test Services plus Home DNA Test Kits
Providing answers to life's toughest questions

DNA Identifiers has been offering clients peace of mind since 2001. Our service is quick, confidential and compassionate. We are commited to excellence in customer service!

Contact Us Today (888) 362-4339

Se Habla Español!

Resources

Please recommend this site to others!




www.dog-dna.com

Bedrooms, Backseats and Courtrooms

The Truth About Sex in America Today
Co-authored by our own Meagan Thompson

Why Paternity Testing Should Include the Mother

“Do I HAVE TO Include the Child’s Mom?”

Short Answer: In any paternity test and at any lab you can run a test without the mother, but it is always best to include her or you might get inaccurate, or even inconclusive, results.

In the process of discussing paternity testing (or other DNA tests) with clients, we always ask if the mother of the child is available to be included in the test. Most of the time, the response we hear is, “Why should I include the mother? I know she is the mom!” It’s as if they think we are trying to include her for some subversive reason. We do our best to explain all of the reasons, but sometimes they fall on deaf ears. Other times, the mother just isn’t available for testing or isn’t aware that the test is taking place and, therefore, can’t be included. While we can perform a paternity test without the mother, there are some very good reasons to add her. We have provided this page so that you may be better informed on how DNA Testing or Paternity Testing works. Take note: this is true of any DNA test at any lab!

DNA TESTING FACTS – Why Include The Mother?

In short: We know she is the mother of the child, including her helps to: prove the child is her’s; eliminate false positives; improve a true positive result; improve accuracy; help prevent genetic mutations from affecting the test; and it eliminates her DNA from the child’s sample, which is helpful in many ways, including if cross contamination occurs (breast milk, newborns, prenatal samples, etc.).

At length: The fact that we know she is the mother is one of many reasons to include her in a DNA Test. The mother of the child provides half of that DNA to the child from her egg. The father provides the other half with his sperm. If we include the mother in the test then we are able to eliminate her half of the DNA (maternal), which leaves the father’s (paternal) half to be tested against the child. Without her inclusion we are testing all of her given DNA as well as the father’s against the possible father being tested. Therefore it is much more accurate and conclusive when she is included and we are able to eliminate her half of the DNA. (More on this is explained below.)

False Positives: Not only does including the mother in the test prove that the child being tested is hers, but it can also prevent false positives from occurring. (These false positive are explained in more detail below.) Furthermore, when the mother is included we can offer a better, stronger test result. If the test is guaranteed, it will increase the positive guaranteed accuracy from 99.9% to 99.99%. This might not seem like a lot, but it actually is. It is the difference of 1000 to 1 vs 10,000 to 1.

Genetic Mutations: Including the mother in the test helps prevent confusion with possible genetic mutations. If a male matches a child at every genetic location, except for one, we have to wonder why that is. If the numbers are off by a single digit, then we consider this to be a “single step mutation”. (Mutations are naturally occurring mismatches between a child and parent and can occur when a sperm cell is being made or when a cell divides.) More on Genetic Mutations.

Cross Contamination: If we are testing a sample that was obtained from the mother’s body (before birth, prenatal testing) or if the mother has been breast feeding a newborn child, there is a good chance that her cellular material could be mixed with the fetal cells or baby’s cheek cells (known as buccal cells).  Testing with the mother’s DNA will allow the lab to identify and remove her DNA from the child’s cells, thereby allowing any cross contamination to be easily worked out.

DNA TESTING EXAMPLES

The below charts show the difference that including the mother in a paternity test can make. We use just one genetic location (we test 16 or more) to prove our point. The first example is a just a father and child only test and in the second example we include the mother.

DNA Test Without The Mother – Possibile Father and Child ONLY

Child Possible Father
Genetic Marker Allele A Allele B Allele A Allele B
vWA 12 16 16 7

The male matches the child since they both have 16s.

DNA Test With The Mother Included – Possibile Father, Child and Mother

Mother Child Possible Father
Genetic Marker Allele A Allele B Allele A Allele B Allele A Allele B
vWA 14 16 12 16 16 7

Unlike the first example where the male matched the child without the mother, which created a false positive, the test result has now changed. As you can see in this particular example, when the mother is included in the test the male no longer matches the child. Since “we know she is the mother” we apply that 16 to her and eliminate it from the male. This is now a NO MATCH scenario. If we have two or more non matches, the male is automatically eliminated as the father of the child.

RECAP:

We know she is the mother of the child, including her helps to: prove the child is hers; eliminate false positives; improve a true positive result; improve accuracy; help prevent genetic mutations from affecting the test; and eliminates her DNA from the child’s sample if cross contamination occurs (breast milk, newborns, prenatal samples, etc.).

Bookmark and Share
Copyright ©2017 Innersanctum Inc. | Privacy Policy | 5316 NE 15th Avenue, Portland OR 97211 | | Updated: 08/24/17 | In California: www.california-dna-testing.com | In Oregon: www.oregon-dna.com | Immigration DNA Testing: www.immigration-test.com | Dog DNA Testing: www.dog-dna.com